Space travels in my blood

I love you. You are worth it. OK? I sometimes reblog discussions of rape, abortion and other potentially triggering issues, and I'm not the best at remembering to tag things because of the hectic manner in which I run this blog… and my life. Follow at your own peril. header credit: Virginia Frances Sterrett Cornify

(via narwhalsrock)

intersectionalfeminism:

Just to get this straight, in this double page spread there are:

  • Fat women
  • Of different races
  • Who are unedited (note the stomach and the rolls)
  • And are being praised for being the weight they are (and eating what they want)
  • While they are all being quotes talking about being healthy at any weight

I mean, this still isn’t perfect, but this is pretty damned impressive for a mainstream tabloid. 

(via trijntjeflip)

There are 41 wars being fought around the world right now. Most of us are busy and we race through our weeks without paying a great deal of attention, but yesterday this week stopped, because one of those wars reached into the sky and grabbed 298 people who could have been any of us.

CBS’ Scott Pelley, commenting on our shared humanity, after the missile attack of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 (source)

(via bobbycaputo)

natalyawk:

Retro Sailor Senshi! I really wanted to draw my favorite sailor scouts in a way that would reflect my vintage sensibilities ;). Moonie has victory rolls, Mars had Betty page-esque hair and Neptune has that beautiful “Old Hollywood glamour hair” … Yes… Hair is very important. Lol.

fecloras:

Classic Mary

fecloras:

Classic Mary

(via darthkaitlyn)

indodla:

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress" is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed by Michel Ocelot. Drawn from elements of West African folk tales, it depicts how a newborn boy, Kirikou, saves his village from the evil witch Karaba.

OH MY WORD I REMEMBER THIS MOVIE

indodla:

fyblackwomenart:

"Kirikou and the Sorceress" is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed by Michel Ocelot. Drawn from elements of West African folk tales, it depicts how a newborn boy, Kirikou, saves his village from the evil witch Karaba.

OH MY WORD I REMEMBER THIS MOVIE

(via psychicdisco)

youdontevenkili:

Sometimes I wonder about what kind of problems would come up if Ned the pie maker came over for dinner at Hannibal’s

(via neptuneyeti)

20aliens:

forge (III)by Luke Evans

20aliens:

forge (III)
by Luke Evans

snorl4x:

how long will it burn if it isn’t an emergency???????

snorl4x:

how long will it burn if it isn’t an emergency???????

(via notsogrumps)

aposse:

Let me tell you about the sheer brilliance that is Meryl Streep and her creation of Miranda Priestly.

Ask any young woman what her favourite film of Meryl’s would be, and I’m quite certain that The Devil Wears Prada would come up in conversation, favourite or not. And it may seem like a generic answer: oh, a film about fashion, so obviously women would identify with it. No, that’s not it. This film isn’t about fashion. This film, as Meryl says, “is a story about a woman at the head of a corporate ladder who’s misunderstood, who’s motives and pressures on her are intense and who doesn’t have time to play certain nice games.”

And though screentime and first bill casting can indicate that Andrea Sachs is the main character, who are you really left thinking about at the end of the film?

Miranda Priestly — the woman who was written as a fictional equivalent to Anna Wintour from the novelist Lauren Weisberger’s experience as her assistant — in the novel was a raging, two-dimensional boss from Hell written only to antagonize and complicate the lives of her employees with impossible standards and even more impossible demands. She was expected to resemble Vogue’s editor-in-chief (Miranda’s office in the film a near replica of Anna’s), so imagine everyone’s fucking surprise the first day Meryl showed up on set wearing an untested wig white as snow, with a voice that never raised, where the most deadly delivery was a whisper.

But this scene on the right, this scene that hadn’t existed until Meryl went and thought, “wait a minute, there’s an imbalance of character here…” so she brought it to light and this was written. Sparingly, as it was said, yet one of the very few scenes to be altered in the entire film. This is how it went: Meryl showed up to the scene without any make-up. She walked in, didn’t talk to anybody, sat down and did it, got up and left, went downstairs and waited. She did this scene once.

Once. 

Once.

And the thing is, this wasn’t meant for you to suddenly cheer for Miranda; it was to show you that she was human and that her success came with a costly price that hurt her the most. She thawed the Snow Queen, extinguished the flames of the fiery boss from Hell and gave her what she never had on paper: substance.

If completely reinventing a character from a subpar novel by giving her actual character and successfully distinguishing her from the woman she was based on isn’t considered pure talent, then I don’t know what is.

(via nightbike)

postllimit:

joshpeckofficiall:

can someone explain to me how i have 18305 settings

must be a large dinner party

postllimit:

joshpeckofficiall:

can someone explain to me how i have 18305 settings

must be a large dinner party

(via santa)

unhistorical:

The Madonna of the Roses (1903) & Pieta (1876), William Adolphe-Bouguereau  

homumado:

spanishnationalist:

If you look like a girl, I’m going to call you a girl.
If I can see your Adam’s apple and you look like a boy, I’m going to call you a boy.
If you look like an it, I’m going to call you a damn it.

image

(via thedeadviper)

aperturemurder:


I can show you the world.

I DON’T WANT TO SEE IT

aperturemurder:

I can show you the world.

I DON’T WANT TO SEE IT

(via thehappyfolk)