Space travels in my blood

I love you. You are worthwhile. I sometimes reblog discussions of rape, abortion and other potentially triggering issues, and I'm not the best at remembering to tag things because of the hectic manner in which I run this blog… and my life. Follow at your own peril. header credit: Virginia Frances Sterrett Cornify

spookydragoneridan:

klokateercatlady:

ilikechildren—fried:

the-fault-in-our-youtubers:

It’s On Us: 

To RECOGNIZE that non-consensual sex is sexual assault.

To IDENTIFY situations in which sexual assault may occur.

To INTERVENE in situations where consent has not or cannot be given.

To CREATE an environment in which sexual assault is unacceptable and survivors are supported.

It’s On Us

Not Alone

hold up

a celebrity filled, gender-neutral, anti-sexual assault PSA?

and this isn’t a BuzzFeed parody?

I think I feel my heart growig three sizes

US’ president and vice-president is in that video. Please do watch it and show support.

(via werewolfnargles)

thepeoplesrecord:

One powerful illustration shows exactly what’s wrong with the way the West talks about EbolaOctober 12, 2014
The Ebola epidemic has killed 3,431 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia; it has killed one in the United States. Liberia’s Defense Minister Brownie Samukai told the U.N. Security Council in September that the disease poses a “serious threat" to the country’s existence; the Obama administration recently reminded everybody that “[America’s] structure would preclude an outbreak.” Health care workers are threatening to strike over dissatisfaction with wages; the U.S. sent 3,000 military personnel directly into the area to help combat the epidemic.
The Ebola headlines in Western media outlets, however, don’t tell that story. The Western media circus has lapped up the Ebola epidemic and paraded it around as its newest act. It’s everywhere you look — stories about “necessary” precautions, tales of children and even police cars under quarantine, fear that the disease has spread to other parts of the country. And it all has one singular focus: America and the West. 
André Carrilho, an illustrator and cartoonist based in Lisbon whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, Vanity Fair and New York magazine, chose to play up this disparity in an August illustration, drawn shortly after two white missionaries stricken with Ebola were admitted to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta."People tend to respond more to illustrations that have a point of view on issues that relate to their lives and their opinions," he told Mic in an email.  
The Ebola epidemic hit a particular nerve with the artist. “People in the African continent are more regarded as an abstract statistic than a patient in the U.S. or Europe,” he said. ”How many individual stories do we know about any African patients? None. They are treated as an indistinguishable crowd.”  
His point is well taken, given the recent arrival of Thomas E. Duncan, the Dallas patient who became America’s only travel-related case of Ebola. He came from Liberia, but the media paid scant attention to the country’s experience with Ebola until his arrival in the United States. Carrilho says the color of Duncan’s skin doesn’t contradict the meaning of the illustration. ”The fact that [Duncan] is black doesn’t change the fact that because he’s on U.S. soil, he deserves more attention in the eyes of the Western media,” he toldMic. It’s not black vs. white in the eyes of the media, but ‘the West vs. the rest.’
"A death in Africa, or Asia for that matter, should be as tragic as a death in Europe or the U.S.A., and it doesn’t seem to be," he said.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

One powerful illustration shows exactly what’s wrong with the way the West talks about Ebola
October 12, 2014

The Ebola epidemic has killed 3,431 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia; it has killed one in the United States. Liberia’s Defense Minister Brownie Samukai told the U.N. Security Council in September that the disease poses a “serious threat" to the country’s existence; the Obama administration recently reminded everybody that “[America’s] structure would preclude an outbreak.” Health care workers are threatening to strike over dissatisfaction with wages; the U.S. sent 3,000 military personnel directly into the area to help combat the epidemic.

The Ebola headlines in Western media outlets, however, don’t tell that story. The Western media circus has lapped up the Ebola epidemic and paraded it around as its newest act. It’s everywhere you look — stories about “necessary” precautions, tales of children and even police cars under quarantine, fear that the disease has spread to other parts of the country. And it all has one singular focus: America and the West. 

André Carrilho, an illustrator and cartoonist based in Lisbon whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New YorkerVanity Fair and New York magazine, chose to play up this disparity in an August illustration, drawn shortly after two white missionaries stricken with Ebola were admitted to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

"People tend to respond more to illustrations that have a point of view on issues that relate to their lives and their opinions," he told Mic in an email.  

The Ebola epidemic hit a particular nerve with the artist. “People in the African continent are more regarded as an abstract statistic than a patient in the U.S. or Europe,” he said. ”How many individual stories do we know about any African patients? None. They are treated as an indistinguishable crowd.”  

His point is well taken, given the recent arrival of Thomas E. Duncan, the Dallas patient who became America’s only travel-related case of Ebola. He came from Liberia, but the media paid scant attention to the country’s experience with Ebola until his arrival in the United States. Carrilho says the color of Duncan’s skin doesn’t contradict the meaning of the illustration. ”The fact that [Duncan] is black doesn’t change the fact that because he’s on U.S. soil, he deserves more attention in the eyes of the Western media,” he toldMic. It’s not black vs. white in the eyes of the media, but ‘the West vs. the rest.’

"A death in Africa, or Asia for that matter, should be as tragic as a death in Europe or the U.S.A., and it doesn’t seem to be," he said.

Full article

lamorbidezza:

Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2014 Details

lamorbidezza:

Chanel Haute Couture Spring 2014 Details

(via lolololololololll5)

Having a soulmate is not always about love. You can find your soulmate in a friendship too.

(via ayva)

rickyhitler:

All hail the brick-phone

rickyhitler:

All hail the brick-phone

(via avacadobbes)

archatlas:

Sergio Varanitsa

A small sampling of the amazing images you will find on the tumblr of this 20 year old photographer from the Ukraine.

Check out this tumblr!

It takes less than 30 seconds and less than 10 clicks to do all 4 links…PLEASE help dogs and cats in shelters!!

crowdog66:

do-not-touch-my-food:

1 - gives kibble to dogs in shelters with a single click

2 - gives 10 pieces of kibble to dogs in shelters, whether you get the question right or not

3 - gives 10 pieces of kibble to cats in shelters, whether you get the question right or not

4 - gives cat litter to cats in shelters with a single click

I’m not saying anybody HAS to do this, but it IS quick and easy. :) 

(via marypoppinthatpussy)

1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

(via betterthanenchanted)

merdesu:

㋖

merdesu:

(via putridpeaches)

Life: The Biggest Troll (Andrew Auernheimer)

sofiajonze:

She says she feels alone all the time, I’m similar.
I meet her in my dreams on the moon; I visit her.

(via classicalamour)

sixpenceee:

5000 people were shown random YouTube videos. Scientists reconstructed the visual experience from brain activity. 

Here is the video

If you want to know more, here is the paper

And here is their website

(via riltmegoria)

sittinginyourlapandtakingadrag:

boy48:

the look

fäde!