Space travels in my blood

I love you. You are worth it. OK? I sometimes reblog discussions of rape, abortion and other potentially triggering issues, and I'm not the best at remembering to tag things because of the hectic manner in which I run this blog… and my life. Follow at your own peril. header credit: Virginia Frances Sterrett Cornify

snorl4x:

how long will it burn if it isn’t an emergency???????

snorl4x:

how long will it burn if it isn’t an emergency???????

(via notsogrumps)

aposse:

Let me tell you about the sheer brilliance that is Meryl Streep and her creation of Miranda Priestly.

Ask any young woman what her favourite film of Meryl’s would be, and I’m quite certain that The Devil Wears Prada would come up in conversation, favourite or not. And it may seem like a generic answer: oh, a film about fashion, so obviously women would identify with it. No, that’s not it. This film isn’t about fashion. This film, as Meryl says, “is a story about a woman at the head of a corporate ladder who’s misunderstood, who’s motives and pressures on her are intense and who doesn’t have time to play certain nice games.”

And though screentime and first bill casting can indicate that Andrea Sachs is the main character, who are you really left thinking about at the end of the film?

Miranda Priestly — the woman who was written as a fictional equivalent to Anna Wintour from the novelist Lauren Weisberger’s experience as her assistant — in the novel was a raging, two-dimensional boss from Hell written only to antagonize and complicate the lives of her employees with impossible standards and even more impossible demands. She was expected to resemble Vogue’s editor-in-chief (Miranda’s office in the film a near replica of Anna’s), so imagine everyone’s fucking surprise the first day Meryl showed up on set wearing an untested wig white as snow, with a voice that never raised, where the most deadly delivery was a whisper.

But this scene on the right, this scene that hadn’t existed until Meryl went and thought, “wait a minute, there’s an imbalance of character here…” so she brought it to light and this was written. Sparingly, as it was said, yet one of the very few scenes to be altered in the entire film. This is how it went: Meryl showed up to the scene without any make-up. She walked in, didn’t talk to anybody, sat down and did it, got up and left, went downstairs and waited. She did this scene once.

Once. 

Once.

And the thing is, this wasn’t meant for you to suddenly cheer for Miranda; it was to show you that she was human and that her success came with a costly price that hurt her the most. She thawed the Snow Queen, extinguished the flames of the fiery boss from Hell and gave her what she never had on paper: substance.

If completely reinventing a character from a subpar novel by giving her actual character and successfully distinguishing her from the woman she was based on isn’t considered pure talent, then I don’t know what is.

(via nightbike)

postllimit:

joshpeckofficiall:

can someone explain to me how i have 18305 settings

must be a large dinner party

postllimit:

joshpeckofficiall:

can someone explain to me how i have 18305 settings

must be a large dinner party

(via santa)

unhistorical:

The Madonna of the Roses (1903) & Pieta (1876), William Adolphe-Bouguereau  

homumado:

spanishnationalist:

If you look like a girl, I’m going to call you a girl.
If I can see your Adam’s apple and you look like a boy, I’m going to call you a boy.
If you look like an it, I’m going to call you a damn it.

image

(via thedeadviper)

aperturemurder:


I can show you the world.

I DON’T WANT TO SEE IT

aperturemurder:

I can show you the world.

I DON’T WANT TO SEE IT

(via thehappyfolk)

ircnpatriot:

as the next season of doctor who approaches its time for me to wrestle with the question

does my faith in peter capaldi outweigh my distrust of steven moffat

(via ilolatmyself)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

This is what a ballerina looks like.

Prima ballerina Misty Copeland showcasing feminine strength in a new campaign for Under Armour.

(via blackgirlsrpretty2)

a-trex:

Shrek / Breaking Bad Parallel. Truly both masterpieces.

(via turianosaurus-wrex)

How Taylor Swift Asserts Power in Red

thepopcultureprincess:

More than any other topic, I have received requests to write about Taylor Swift. This is understandable to me: she defies easy categorization. It’s not difficult to craft theses about Little Things or Salute, because these texts are very clear-cut. Taylor Swift evades this neat organization, which makes it incredibly difficult to construct any sort of clear thesis about her. (I mean, I guess “I don’t know what the hell to do with Taylor Swift” is a thesis, but who wants to hear that?)

When I think about her as a musician, as a woman, as a public figure, more than anything I keep coming back to her power. She is a very powerful woman; there is no question about that in my view. This power sometimes make her seem frigid, distant, aloof. And while I could spend many words writing about the discourse surrounding her as a shamelessly powerful, unyielding woman, today I want to talk about her music.

Specifically, I want to talk about how she asserts her power in her most recent album, Red. Her perspective is very female, very feminine. Whereas artists like Little Mix and Marina & The Diamonds overtly and explicitly make references to their own strength and directly critique patriarchal structures, Taylor’s music is enshrouded in twee imagery. Her world is soft around the edges, meant to be consumed through an Instagram filter. Frivolous, saccharine, stylized - these are all descriptors that apply to her music. (I don’t mean any of this description as a value judgment, by the way. I don’t think there’s anything inherently wrong in softness or frivolity, but I think it’s hard to argue that her music isn’t largely soft and frivolous.) The phrase “flashbacks and echoes”, used in Red, very aptly describes her aesthetic, I think.

Read More

(via adorabillie)

thestylechild:

Givenchy

lalondes:

wes anderson movies taught me that fucked up horrifying tragic living circumstances are no excuse not to carefully maintain a cute pastoral aesthetic at all times

(via softwaring)